About ISMB 2020

ISMB 2020 – Mark your calendars!

The annual international conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) is the flagship meeting of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB). The 2020 conference is the 28th ISMB conference, which has grown to become the world’s largest bioinformatics/computational biology conference.

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92 Speakers
1831 Registrations

Sessions

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  • 07:00 - 08:00

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Gryte Satas, Phd, Brown University

  • 08:45 - 09:45

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speakers:

    Antti Honkela, PhD, University of Helsinki

    Caroline Labelle, PhD, Université de Montréal

  • 1:45 - 2:45

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speakers:

    Christophe Dessimoz, PhD

    Ignacio Ibarra Del Río, PhD Student,

  • 10:45 - 11:45

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speakers:

    Hirak Sarkar, PhD

    William Stafford Noble, PhD

  • 09.00 - 09:30

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speakers:

    Da-Inn Lee, PhD, University of Wisconsin

    Dr. Jeroen de Ridder, PhD, UMC Utrecht

  • 08:00 - 08:30

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speakers:

    Da-Inn Lee, PhD, University of Wisconsin

    Michio Iwata, PhD

  • 11:40 - 12:00

    Descendant Cell Fraction: Copy-aware Inference of Clonal Composition and Evolution in Cancer

    Gryte Satas is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Princeton University. Described as “a role model” by her new colleagues at Providence, Rhode Island’s Rochambeau Library, Gryte Satas, a PhD candidate at Brown University’s Department of Computer Science, has just made a unique contribution to her community. She’s leading a new Girls Who Code Club, designed to provide young women with computer science and programming skills, as well as opportunities to learn about everything from cryptography to artificial intelligence to developing mobile applications.

    Speaker:

    Gryte Satas, Phd, Brown University

  • 12:00 - 12:20

    Subpopulation detection and their comparative analysis across single cell experiments with PopCorn

    After receiving a Ph.D. in Computer Science form the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Teresa Przytycka's research has been concentrated on the theory of algorithms until, as a Sloan/DOE Computational Biology fellow, she started to apply algorithmic approaches to problems in Molecular and Systems biology. As an NIH Senior Investigator, she is heading a research group that focuses on computational modeling and analysis of biological processes, with an emphasis on hypothesis and theory-driven questions that are enabled by large-scale data.

    Speaker:

    Teresa M. Przytycka, PhD

  • 12:00 - 12:20

    Drug repositioning based on bounded nuclear norm regularization

    Mengyun Yang is a PhD candidate in the School of Computer Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China. His current research interests include machine learning, deep learning, and bioinformatics. His representative papers have been published in refereed journals such as Bioinformatics, PLoS Computational Biology, Briefings in Bioinformatics, and conference proceedings such as ISMB and BIBM.

    Speaker:

    Mengyun Yang, PhD, Central South University

  • 12:00 - 12:20

    Pan-cancer identification of transcription factors associated with aberrant DNA methylation patterns

    Roza Berhanu Lemma completed her PhD in molecular biology from the Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, under the supervision of Prof. Odd Stokke Gabrielsen in Dec. 2018. Her PhD thesis is entitled ‘Novel mechanisms controlling the interplay between SUMOylation, chromatin remodelling and transcription — A study of the functional interaction between the SUMO-protease SENP1, the chromatin remodeler CHD3 and the pioneer transcription factor c-Myb’. Although Roza is a molecular biologist by training, she developed an increasing interest in bioinformatics and computational biology. As a result, she joined the group in Jan. 2019. She is interested in transcriptional regulation and dysregulation, epigenetics, and their implications in cancer. Her current project is on the interplay between DNA methylation and TF-binding.

    Speaker:

    Roza Berhanu Lemma, PhD

  • 12:20 - 12:40

    Minnow: A principled framework for rapid simulation of dscRNA-seq data at the read level

    Hirak Sarkar received his masters degree in Computer Science from Indian Statistical Institute (ISI) in 2013. Before that he completed his bachelors (B.Tech) from Kalyani Govt. Engineering College in 2011, in Computer Science. At ISI, he defended his masters thesis in graph theory under the supervision of Prof. Bhargab Bhattacharyya and Prof. Sandip Das. Before joining Stony Brook, Hirak was a researcher for some time at National University of Singapore and also worked as a research fellow at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur.

    Speaker:

    Hirak Sarkar, PhD

  • 12:20 - 12:40

    Enhancing the Drug Discovery Process: Bayesian Inference for the Analysis and Comparison of Dose-Response Experiments

    Caroline Labelle is a PhD student at Institut de recherche en immunologie et en cancérologie (IRIC) Université de Montréal. She assist biochemistry and bioinformatics students during practical laboratory sessions including familiarization with a Linux terminal, familiarization with public databases, interpretation of bioinformatics analyzes, use of the PyMol tool.

    Speaker:

    Caroline Labelle, PhD, Université de Montréal

  • 12:20 - 12:40

    Allele-specific analysis of epigenomic and transcriptomic data to study Drosophila developmental cis-regulatory architecture

    Swann Floc'Hlay am pursuing a PhD, working in collaboration with the Furlong Lab (EMBL, Heidelberg) on ​​the impact of natural genetic variations on transcriptional regulation in Drosophila embryos.

    Speaker:

    Swann Floc’Hlay, Ph.D

  • 12:40 - 13:00

    Representation Transfer for Differentially Private Drug Sensitivity Prediction

    Until December 2018, Antti Honkela was an Assistant Professor of Statistics at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki. Before that, he was an Academy Research Fellow at the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT, Department of Computer Science, University of Helsinki. His research interests include Bayesian machine learning and probabilistic modelling, privacy-preserving machine learning and differential privacy as well as computational systems biology. I am interested in modelling and analysis of quantitative genomic sequencing data and especially genomic time series data.

    Speaker:

    Antti Honkela, PhD, University of Helsinki

  • 08:30 - 09:30

    Traveling across spaces: the power of embedding genomic and proteomic data into a latent space

    William Stafford Noble received the Ph.D. in computer science and cognitive science from UC San Diego in 1998. After a one-year postdoc with David Haussler at UC Santa Cruz, he became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Columbia University. In 2002, he joined the faculty of the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington. His research group develops and applies statistical and machine learning techniques for modeling and understanding biological processes at the molecular level. Noble is a Fellow of the International Society for Computational Biology and currently chairs the NIH Biodata Management and Analysis Study section. He is the author of >230 peer reviewed publications and has advised 21 postdoctoral fellows and 15 graduate students, including current faculty members at Columbia, UCLA, UC Irvine, University of Delaware, Colorado State University, University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, and others.

    Speaker:

    William Stafford Noble, PhD

  • 10:00 - 11:00

    Mapping multi-way chromatin contacts of individual alleles using PromethION long-read sequencing

    Dr. de Ridder is Principle Investigator / Associate Professor in the Center for Molecular Medicine of the UMC Utrecht. He obtained his Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the Delft University of Technology (TUD) in 2005 (cum laude). Subsequently, he started a PhD to work on pathway discovery in insertional mutagenesis data. This work was carried out in the Delft Bioinformatics lab (Reinders group, TUD) and at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (Wessels group). Dr. de Ridder was an Assistant Professor in the Delft Bioinformatics Lab from 2010 to 2016, after which he moved into his current position at the UMC Utrecht.

    Speaker:

    Dr. Jeroen de Ridder, PhD, UMC Utrecht

  • 10:20 - 11:20

    Quantifying the rates and routes of metastasis

    Trained in molecular and computational biology and jointly appointed in Medicine and Genetics, Dr. Christina Curtis pursues systems biology and computational approaches to establish a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of cancer progression. Dr. Curtis’s laboratory leverages multi-omic data coupled with computational modeling and iterative experimentation in order to define the molecular determinants and dynamics of tumor progression and to identify robust biomarkers. Her research has helped to redefine the molecular map of breast cancer and led to new paradigms in understanding how human tumors progress. Dr. Curtis is the recipient of the awards from the V Foundation for Cancer Research, STOP Cancer, the AACR and is a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences. She received the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award in 2018. Dr. Curtis is the principal investigator on grants from the NIH/NCI, NHGRI, Department of Defense, American Association for Cancer Research, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen Foundation and Emerson Collective. She serves on the Editorial Boards of Breast Cancer Research, Cancer Discovery, Carcinogenesis: Integrative Biology, Cell Systems, JCO Precision Oncology and the Journal of Computational Biology.

    Speaker:

    Christina Curtis, PhD

  • 10:20 - 11:10

    Five ways computational biologists can accelerate medicine

    Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD is the inaugural Chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School. He develops and applies computational techniques to address disease at multiple scales: From whole healthcare systems as “living laboratories” to the functional genomics of neurodevelopment with a focus on autism. Kohane’s i2b2 project is currently deployed internationally to over 120 major academic health centers to drive discovery research in disease and pharmacovigilance (including providing evidence on drugs which ultimately contributed to “black box”ing by the FDA). Dr. Kohane has published several hundred papers in the medical literature and authored a widely used book on Microarrays for an Integrative Genomics. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

    Speaker:

    Isaac Kohane, PhD

  • 11:00 - 11:20

    Discovering Structural Units of Chromosomal Organization with Matrix Factorization and Graph Regularization

    Da-Inn Lee is a PhD student in Biomedical Data Science at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, working in Sushmita Roy's lab. This lab specializes in developing statistical machine learning tools to gain insight from large biological networks. Her current project involves learning the organizational principles of how the DNA folds itself inside the cell, and how this in turn builds a scaffolding for gene regulatory networks.

    Speaker:

    Da-Inn Lee, PhD, University of Wisconsin

  • 11:10 - 11:20

    Predicting drug-induced transcriptome responses of a wide range of human cell lines by a novel tensor-train decomposition algorithm

    Michio Iwata is a JSPS Research Fellow of the Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences in Kyushu University. He completed his PhD program in Agriculture at the Kyushu University in Japan.

    Speaker:

    Michio Iwata, PhD

  • 11:20 - 11:40

    Alignment-free Filtering for cfNA Fusion Fragments

    Xiao Yang is a Senior Bioinformatics Scientist at GRAIL, Inc. Xiao has also worked as a Sr. Bioinformatics Scientist at Illumina. He was a Scientist II Computational Biology at Biogen Idec. and a Computational Biologist II, Scientist, Computational Biologist, Scientist at Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He graduated from Iowa State University with a PhD in Biology, Bioinformatics.

    Speaker:

    Xiao Yang, PhD

  • 11:20 - 11:40

    Inference of transcription factor cooperativity and its impact on protein-phenotype interactions

    Ignacio studied Biochemistry at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile and did his Master’s Degree on the modeling of full atom DNA structures by the satisfaction of spatial restraints. His main research interests in the Zaugg group are protein-DNA interactions and the integration of multiple molecular data for a better understanding of mechanisms and function of cooperative transcription factor binding. Apart from research, Ignacio likes to play guitar/ukelele, cooking and reading.

    Speaker:

    Ignacio Ibarra Del Río, PhD Student,

  • 11:40 - 12:00

    Identifying and ranking potential driver genes of Alzheimer's Disease using multi-view evidence aggregation

    Sumit Mukherjee completed his PhD in Computational and Systems Biology under the guidance of Dr. Georg Seelig and Dr. Sreeram Kannan. His dissertation title was "Learning and Inference with Single Cell Data". He collaborated closely with Dr. Su-in Lee (UW CSE & Genome Sciences) and Dr. Abhyudai Singh (UDel ECE/Math) for a couple of his computational projects. He has also worked on the development a pedestrian centered routing app (Accessmap) with Dr. Anat Caspi of the UW e-Science Institute. Prior to joining UW, he was a MS-PhD student in Electrical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 2011-2013 under the guidance of Dr. Sandipan Mishra and Dr. John Wen. His thesis research loosely dealt with finding ways to minimize the energy consumption in building HVAC systems while accounting for the comfort requirements of the occupants. Prior to that, he had got my undergrad degree in Power Engineering from Jadavpur University, India in 2011.

    Speaker:

    Sumit Mukherjee, PhD

  • 1:45 - 2:45

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Christophe Dessimoz, PhD

    Ignacio Ibarra Del Río, PhD Student,

  • 07:00 - 08:00

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Gryte Satas, Phd, Brown University

  • 10:45 - 11:45

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Hirak Sarkar, PhD

    William Stafford Noble, PhD

  • 08:00 - 08:30

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Da-Inn Lee, PhD, University of Wisconsin

    Michio Iwata, PhD

  • 08:30 - 09:30

    Traveling across spaces: the power of embedding genomic and proteomic data into a latent space

    William Stafford Noble received the Ph.D. in computer science and cognitive science from UC San Diego in 1998. After a one-year postdoc with David Haussler at UC Santa Cruz, he became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Columbia University. In 2002, he joined the faculty of the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington. His research group develops and applies statistical and machine learning techniques for modeling and understanding biological processes at the molecular level. Noble is a Fellow of the International Society for Computational Biology and currently chairs the NIH Biodata Management and Analysis Study section. He is the author of >230 peer reviewed publications and has advised 21 postdoctoral fellows and 15 graduate students, including current faculty members at Columbia, UCLA, UC Irvine, University of Delaware, Colorado State University, University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, and others.

    Speaker:

    William Stafford Noble, PhD

  • 08:45 - 09:45

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Antti Honkela, PhD, University of Helsinki

    Caroline Labelle, PhD, Université de Montréal

  • 09.00 - 09:30

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry

    Speaker:

    Da-Inn Lee, PhD, University of Wisconsin

    Dr. Jeroen de Ridder, PhD, UMC Utrecht

  • 10:20 - 11:20

    Quantifying the rates and routes of metastasis

    Trained in molecular and computational biology and jointly appointed in Medicine and Genetics, Dr. Christina Curtis pursues systems biology and computational approaches to establish a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of cancer progression. Dr. Curtis’s laboratory leverages multi-omic data coupled with computational modeling and iterative experimentation in order to define the molecular determinants and dynamics of tumor progression and to identify robust biomarkers. Her research has helped to redefine the molecular map of breast cancer and led to new paradigms in understanding how human tumors progress. Dr. Curtis is the recipient of the awards from the V Foundation for Cancer Research, STOP Cancer, the AACR and is a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences. She received the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award in 2018. Dr. Curtis is the principal investigator on grants from the NIH/NCI, NHGRI, Department of Defense, American Association for Cancer Research, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen Foundation and Emerson Collective. She serves on the Editorial Boards of Breast Cancer Research, Cancer Discovery, Carcinogenesis: Integrative Biology, Cell Systems, JCO Precision Oncology and the Journal of Computational Biology.

    Speaker:

    Christina Curtis, PhD

  • 11:20 - 11:40

    Alignment-free Filtering for cfNA Fusion Fragments

    Xiao Yang is a Senior Bioinformatics Scientist at GRAIL, Inc. Xiao has also worked as a Sr. Bioinformatics Scientist at Illumina. He was a Scientist II Computational Biology at Biogen Idec. and a Computational Biologist II, Scientist, Computational Biologist, Scientist at Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He graduated from Iowa State University with a PhD in Biology, Bioinformatics.

    Speaker:

    Xiao Yang, PhD

  • 11:40 - 12:00

    Descendant Cell Fraction: Copy-aware Inference of Clonal Composition and Evolution in Cancer

    Gryte Satas is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Princeton University. Described as “a role model” by her new colleagues at Providence, Rhode Island’s Rochambeau Library, Gryte Satas, a PhD candidate at Brown University’s Department of Computer Science, has just made a unique contribution to her community. She’s leading a new Girls Who Code Club, designed to provide young women with computer science and programming skills, as well as opportunities to learn about everything from cryptography to artificial intelligence to developing mobile applications.

    Speaker:

    Gryte Satas, Phd, Brown University

  • 12:00 - 12:20

    Subpopulation detection and their comparative analysis across single cell experiments with PopCorn

    After receiving a Ph.D. in Computer Science form the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Teresa Przytycka's research has been concentrated on the theory of algorithms until, as a Sloan/DOE Computational Biology fellow, she started to apply algorithmic approaches to problems in Molecular and Systems biology. As an NIH Senior Investigator, she is heading a research group that focuses on computational modeling and analysis of biological processes, with an emphasis on hypothesis and theory-driven questions that are enabled by large-scale data.

    Speaker:

    Teresa M. Przytycka, PhD

  • 12:20 - 12:40

    Minnow: A principled framework for rapid simulation of dscRNA-seq data at the read level

    Hirak Sarkar received his masters degree in Computer Science from Indian Statistical Institute (ISI) in 2013. Before that he completed his bachelors (B.Tech) from Kalyani Govt. Engineering College in 2011, in Computer Science. At ISI, he defended his masters thesis in graph theory under the supervision of Prof. Bhargab Bhattacharyya and Prof. Sandip Das. Before joining Stony Brook, Hirak was a researcher for some time at National University of Singapore and also worked as a research fellow at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur.

    Speaker:

    Hirak Sarkar, PhD

  • 10:20 - 11:10

    Five ways computational biologists can accelerate medicine

    Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD is the inaugural Chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School. He develops and applies computational techniques to address disease at multiple scales: From whole healthcare systems as “living laboratories” to the functional genomics of neurodevelopment with a focus on autism. Kohane’s i2b2 project is currently deployed internationally to over 120 major academic health centers to drive discovery research in disease and pharmacovigilance (including providing evidence on drugs which ultimately contributed to “black box”ing by the FDA). Dr. Kohane has published several hundred papers in the medical literature and authored a widely used book on Microarrays for an Integrative Genomics. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

    Speaker:

    Isaac Kohane, PhD

  • 11:10 - 11:20

    Predicting drug-induced transcriptome responses of a wide range of human cell lines by a novel tensor-train decomposition algorithm

    Michio Iwata is a JSPS Research Fellow of the Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences in Kyushu University. He completed his PhD program in Agriculture at the Kyushu University in Japan.

    Speaker:

    Michio Iwata, PhD

  • 11:40 - 12:00

    Identifying and ranking potential driver genes of Alzheimer's Disease using multi-view evidence aggregation

    Sumit Mukherjee completed his PhD in Computational and Systems Biology under the guidance of Dr. Georg Seelig and Dr. Sreeram Kannan. His dissertation title was "Learning and Inference with Single Cell Data". He collaborated closely with Dr. Su-in Lee (UW CSE & Genome Sciences) and Dr. Abhyudai Singh (UDel ECE/Math) for a couple of his computational projects. He has also worked on the development a pedestrian centered routing app (Accessmap) with Dr. Anat Caspi of the UW e-Science Institute. Prior to joining UW, he was a MS-PhD student in Electrical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 2011-2013 under the guidance of Dr. Sandipan Mishra and Dr. John Wen. His thesis research loosely dealt with finding ways to minimize the energy consumption in building HVAC systems while accounting for the comfort requirements of the occupants. Prior to that, he had got my undergrad degree in Power Engineering from Jadavpur University, India in 2011.

    Speaker:

    Sumit Mukherjee, PhD

  • 12:00 - 12:20

    Drug repositioning based on bounded nuclear norm regularization

    Mengyun Yang is a PhD candidate in the School of Computer Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China. His current research interests include machine learning, deep learning, and bioinformatics. His representative papers have been published in refereed journals such as Bioinformatics, PLoS Computational Biology, Briefings in Bioinformatics, and conference proceedings such as ISMB and BIBM.

    Speaker:

    Mengyun Yang, PhD, Central South University

  • 12:20 - 12:40

    Enhancing the Drug Discovery Process: Bayesian Inference for the Analysis and Comparison of Dose-Response Experiments

    Caroline Labelle is a PhD student at Institut de recherche en immunologie et en cancérologie (IRIC) Université de Montréal. She assist biochemistry and bioinformatics students during practical laboratory sessions including familiarization with a Linux terminal, familiarization with public databases, interpretation of bioinformatics analyzes, use of the PyMol tool.

    Speaker:

    Caroline Labelle, PhD, Université de Montréal

  • 12:40 - 13:00

    Representation Transfer for Differentially Private Drug Sensitivity Prediction

    Until December 2018, Antti Honkela was an Assistant Professor of Statistics at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki. Before that, he was an Academy Research Fellow at the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT, Department of Computer Science, University of Helsinki. His research interests include Bayesian machine learning and probabilistic modelling, privacy-preserving machine learning and differential privacy as well as computational systems biology. I am interested in modelling and analysis of quantitative genomic sequencing data and especially genomic time series data.

    Speaker:

    Antti Honkela, PhD, University of Helsinki

  • 10:00 - 11:00

    Mapping multi-way chromatin contacts of individual alleles using PromethION long-read sequencing

    Dr. de Ridder is Principle Investigator / Associate Professor in the Center for Molecular Medicine of the UMC Utrecht. He obtained his Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the Delft University of Technology (TUD) in 2005 (cum laude). Subsequently, he started a PhD to work on pathway discovery in insertional mutagenesis data. This work was carried out in the Delft Bioinformatics lab (Reinders group, TUD) and at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (Wessels group). Dr. de Ridder was an Assistant Professor in the Delft Bioinformatics Lab from 2010 to 2016, after which he moved into his current position at the UMC Utrecht.

    Speaker:

    Dr. Jeroen de Ridder, PhD, UMC Utrecht

  • 11:00 - 11:20

    Discovering Structural Units of Chromosomal Organization with Matrix Factorization and Graph Regularization

    Da-Inn Lee is a PhD student in Biomedical Data Science at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, working in Sushmita Roy's lab. This lab specializes in developing statistical machine learning tools to gain insight from large biological networks. Her current project involves learning the organizational principles of how the DNA folds itself inside the cell, and how this in turn builds a scaffolding for gene regulatory networks.

    Speaker:

    Da-Inn Lee, PhD, University of Wisconsin

  • 11:20 - 11:40

    Inference of transcription factor cooperativity and its impact on protein-phenotype interactions

    Ignacio studied Biochemistry at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile and did his Master’s Degree on the modeling of full atom DNA structures by the satisfaction of spatial restraints. His main research interests in the Zaugg group are protein-DNA interactions and the integration of multiple molecular data for a better understanding of mechanisms and function of cooperative transcription factor binding. Apart from research, Ignacio likes to play guitar/ukelele, cooking and reading.

    Speaker:

    Ignacio Ibarra Del Río, PhD Student,

  • 12:00 - 12:20

    Pan-cancer identification of transcription factors associated with aberrant DNA methylation patterns

    Roza Berhanu Lemma completed her PhD in molecular biology from the Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, under the supervision of Prof. Odd Stokke Gabrielsen in Dec. 2018. Her PhD thesis is entitled ‘Novel mechanisms controlling the interplay between SUMOylation, chromatin remodelling and transcription — A study of the functional interaction between the SUMO-protease SENP1, the chromatin remodeler CHD3 and the pioneer transcription factor c-Myb’. Although Roza is a molecular biologist by training, she developed an increasing interest in bioinformatics and computational biology. As a result, she joined the group in Jan. 2019. She is interested in transcriptional regulation and dysregulation, epigenetics, and their implications in cancer. Her current project is on the interplay between DNA methylation and TF-binding.

    Speaker:

    Roza Berhanu Lemma, PhD

  • 12:20 - 12:40

    Allele-specific analysis of epigenomic and transcriptomic data to study Drosophila developmental cis-regulatory architecture

    Swann Floc'Hlay am pursuing a PhD, working in collaboration with the Furlong Lab (EMBL, Heidelberg) on ​​the impact of natural genetic variations on transcriptional regulation in Drosophila embryos.

    Speaker:

    Swann Floc’Hlay, Ph.D

Featured Speakers

Groundbreaking keynotes, critical breakouts, and more.

William Stafford Noble, PhD

University of Washington

Xiao Yang, PhD

GRAIL, Inc.

Isaac Kohane, PhD

Harvard Medical School

Christina Curtis, PhD

Stanford University

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